Growing Through Play: 6 Tips for Playing with Young Children

Playing with children is crucial at any age.  Playing with small children is very different from playing with teenagers and requires a dedicated set of strategies. Women are usually much better with smaller children than men, yet everybody can learn and improve. In this guest article, Becky Holton shares her tips and strategies.

As the popular saying goes, Work without play makes Jack a dull boy. Play is crucial for the growth and development of children. Studies have shown that children who don’t read more

A letter from a real 1:1 student after the first session with Anna

Recently we published testimonies of some students who completed the 1:1 course. Today I will publish a real letter of a real student between the first and the second sessions with Anna. I got his permission to use the full letter and the entire content of the message. =&0=& 2. More good news: I was able to read the article I have attached to this email and create some markers for it and I remembered them, and the topic. I surprised myself a little when I realized that I actually could remember the markers! They were FAR from perfect, and they need much work, but I was able to list them off! 3. I need more training with markers. I’m sure it will come with time. But I think this positive experience I had today while reading is more fuel in the tank to A. keep me practicing and B. move me towards my goals! 4. I am having a hard time assimilating practicing into my everyday life. it seems like a lot of work for me at this point in my development to use the skills at my work, in my life, etc. I hope that as I just consistently put in the work every day, the skills will become easier, and will automatically come into my life. This is my hope.

The first session

The first session of the 1:1 with Anna is critical for most of our students. Why?
  • Diagnostics. Anna can easily understand what is holding back most of our students and provide simple corrective actions.
  • Homework. After the first session, the student is asked to highlight the important words in the article read. Then we increase the complexity of the article. The submission is in writing and I personally try to help each and every student. There are multiple iterations.
  • Integration. Many students do not understand how the methods they learn can be applied to their specific needs. We could not make 100 courses for all the professions we work with. However, in 1:1 we can provide immediate guidance.
  • Style. What kind of markers and visualizations works for you? We try to brainstorm with our students and try different things. Quite often we settle on something very different from the default guidelines. Maybe even surprising.
  • Freedom. The students who work alone need to adhere to very specific guidelines. Otherwise, there is no way to check they are not making crucial mistakes. With our guidance, it is easy and safe to express yourself in a constructive way.
  • Training materials. By the end of the training, you should be able to apply the techniques with everything you read. This does not mean you should use the harder materials for the training itself. Quite possibly, they will be handy only after months of training with simpler stuff.
  • Organization. Many students have a hard time organizing their thoughts and tracking progress. We provide examples, ideas, and some basic tools. Often we review the results and suggest further improvements.
  • Confidence. With so many questions it is easy to lose confidence. We can compare the parameters of performance and improvement with other students and eliminate misplaced doubts.

The density of reading materials

During the initial months of training, we recommend controlling the kind of materials you read. Typically, we recommend articles of 500 to 3000 words with more information density than a fiction or motivational text, but less than wikipedia. Usually, this means reading contents of this blog, BusinessInsider, SeekingAlpha, PsychologyToday, ExtremeTech or similar.

At the same time, we ask our students not to waste their time reading the stuff they will never read. This is a contradiction, read more

Best mnemonics and memory training for medical students and nurses – Part 2

Many of my readers and students practice medicine. All memory methods we teach are perfectly suited for medicine. Moreover, in 1:1 Anna uses some exclusive methods SPECIFICALLY developed for the medical students.  Since memoization is any extremely important and time-consuming part of any medical practice, and since medical practice is so long and intense,  you have no excuse for skipping memory practice.

Here Chase goes into the methods he actually uses, ending up with the methods we actually read more

Life skills everyone can learn

When we discuss learning, we usually refer to academic subjects. Life skills are somewhat different, easier to acquire and more fulfilling. Let us indulge in the discussion following suggestions here, here, here, here, here, here.

Bucket lists

People fill bucket lists with the things they want to do before they die. Acquiring yet another degree is rarely an item in such a list. What people really want are simple things that are easy to do or learn.

For example, most people want to travel to certain countries read more

What is “lifelong learning”?

I believe in lifelong learning, and I want to explain what I mean by it. In all of my bigger courses, I promise you to triple three critical skills. Yet the more skills we improve, the better we understand the things we still have to do. The better we are, the harder it gets to improve. Hence we need a lifelong commitment.

The initial goal and diminishing returns

One of the things we ask our students is stating their learning goals. They usually write down some reading speed and retention percentage. For example, 1200wpm and 80% retention.  read more

Superlearner story: JB cures depression

You probably noticed the new course on Thinkific we call KeyToVision. It deals with visualization and analytical thinking as the main tool for solving personal problems. The common problems are depression, stress and traumas. JB is one of the reasons we developed these tools, so his testimony is especially important for me.  My student JB is a psychologist and financial advisor, so he read more

Good and bad curiosity

Is curiosity good or bad? Depends whom you ask. If anything, for me curiosity is complex and inspiring. You may be curious enough to read here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

Curiosity in reading

The first time we mention curiosity in our courses is when people start reading. Before reading something we urge our students to skim through the text very quickly, ask questions, build hypothesis and otherwise build up some curiosity. Otherwise, reading gets really boring and quite often we learn nothing.

Curiosity read more

Exploring the Art of Patience to Create a Positive Impact

Patience and positivity go hand in hand; patience is born out of positivity, and something positive can sprout from staying patient in the most challenging situations. Understanding the intricate chains that bind the two is only possible with experience. Some learn this lesson early on, and some might reach a ripe old age. Regardless, this is something a person must learn and accept for themselves because no matter how much another person tries, they cannot make them feel or understand it.

OK, read more

Flow is the opposite of perfectionism

We all want to experience flow: face a hard challenge, exhibiting great technique with laser focus, enjoy the creative drive and complete a great task. Very few of us do, and even those who experience flow cannot know when this wonderful experience will happen again. Maybe you want to explore the subject yourself here, here, here, here, here, and here.

Why flow is the opposite of perfection

Many great pieces of arts, books, inventions and computer codes can be traced to a short sprint of creation we call flow. It may seam that the read more

5 Ways Studying Abroad Will Boost Your Career

Some of our readers need to decide between studying at home or going abroad. In this article, we will try to help. I studied at home, and it had certain advantages as it was cheap and comfortable, I could work during the studies, and the networking I did was always relevant. There are positive sides to studying abroad too.  As I could not speak from my own experience I asked a guest author to fill in. This is one of the articles which are written from a unique personal perspective, so I read more