Magical thinking and how we persuade ourselves

Magical thinking is one of the most potent cognitive biases. Of all people in the world, it is easiest for us to lie to ourselves. This self-deception may help us remain strong in times of great danger and uncertainty, and it may also lead to our downfall in times of prosperity and stability. In this …

What is your annual theme?

Today we start a new year, and it is great to start it with renewed purpose and motivation. To do that we use a tool called “annual theme”. You can have weekly or monthly themes, but an annual theme is more appropriate. Today’s selection of articles is very good. Do not miss a chance to …

Why Projects Fail & The Role of Project Managers

A project has so many moving parts that it can be easy for things to go wrong. The role of a project manager in any project is to ensure every bit of a project is running as planned but this is far from an easy job. This infographic from Trainwest takes you through why projects …

Tips on exercising your brain

We address memory training quite seriously and have many different exercises on our site. In this post, I want to share some training tips inspired by this, this, this and this articles. Specific and generic training If you research a subject or write a code, you do many different and seemingly unconnected tasks. It is …

Is willpower limited?

The words “resilience”, “perseverance” and “grit” are used interchangeably in modern education. Is is justified? Should we train and manage our willpower? This is a common subject in our blog. For today’s references check here, here, here, here, here and here. Vocabulary issue: resilience vs perseverance vs grit There are small differences between these terms, …

Commitment, resilience and vagus nerve training

There was a large series about relaxation and resilience on the psychologytoday blog. In a spirit quite similar to our blog, the relevant activities are called “training” and the organ being trained is neurologically defined as “vagus nerve”. I link all of it here: part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5, part …

Reading, rereading and ghosting effects

Quite often true memories are mixed up with false memories. Quite often this happens when we read too slow. For today’s article, you may want to read here, here, here, here, and here. This article is inteded to be an overview: each of the subjects was already discussed in some other form on this blog. …

Superlearning for data scientists and AI programmers

Occasionally I write posts with specific tips for programmers of different kinds. Nowadays data scientists and AI programmers are in high demand. New areas like deep neural networks, chatbots, and mixed reality pose a new level of challenges. How will you treat these challenges as superlearners is up to you. This post focuses on working …

Massive memory structures

I am occasionally asked how can someone remember 1 mil visualizations. Now 1 mil visualizations is a lot. For comparison, The King James Authorized Bible has 783,137 words. It is enough to know ~5000 words and 5000 phrases of a foreign language to be fluent, e.g. about 100,000 visualizations should suffice per language. Practically, not …

Micro PAO

Recently PAO became the default mode of visualization we teach. I will first explain the method as we use it and then why it became so prominent in our materials. Specific markers are trigrams Most of our students have advanced degrees and read complex materials. As materials get increasingly complex, a specific marker becomes a …